Watch the official NASA Broadcast of James Webb Space Telescope Launchs in 4 days - December 24th 2021

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is finally launched on Dec. 25 at 7:20 a.m. EST Saturday on an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, South America. Webb, a partnership with the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency, will explore every phase of cosmic history – from within our solar system to the most distant observable galaxies in the early universe.

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Join Webb on its journey of discovery - From Vision to Reality, James Webb Telescope will be the largest telescope ever sent into space by the 24th of December 2021. Don't miss it! 

Update: NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is finally launched on Dec. 25 at 7:20 a.m. EST Saturday on an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, South America. Webb, a partnership with the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency, will explore every phase of cosmic history – from within our solar system to the most distant observable galaxies in the early universe.

Back in the day, a group of astronauts was wondering; It’s our nature. How did we get here? Are we alone in the universe? How does the universe work?

The James Webb Space Telescope is NASA’s ambitious scientific endeavor to answer these questions, in partnership with the European and Canadian space agencies. Webb will build on the legacy of previous space-based telescopes to push the boundaries of human knowledge even further, to the formation of the first galaxies and the horizons of other worlds. 

Revealing the Hidden Universe

The James Webb Space Telescope joins a great legacy of space-based astronomy. NASA’s space telescope missions have revolutionized our understanding of the universe and our place within it. Webb has the high resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope and the ability to detect light wavelengths into the mid-infrared range, like the Spitzer Space Telescope. Webb’s infrared-detecting technology will reveal the hidden universe to our eyes: stars shrouded in clouds of dust, water in the atmospheres of other worlds, and the first light from the earliest galaxies ever formed.

The science that will be done using the Webb telescope will bring us closer to NASA’s overarching science goals of discovering secrets of the universe and searching for life beyond Earth. Read more...

Beyond Visible Light

The rainbow of light that the human eye can see is a small portion of the total range of light, known in science as the electromagnetic spectrum. Telescopes can be engineered to detect light outside the visible range to show us otherwise hidden regions of space. The James Webb Space Telescope detects near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, the light beyond the red end of the visible spectrum.

This infographic illustrates the spectrum of electromagnetic energy, specifically highlighting the portions detected by NASA’s Hubble, Spitzer, and Webb space telescopes. CREDIT: NASA and J. Olmsted [STScI]. GET THE FULL IMAGE IN RESOURCE GALLERY >

 

Infrared light reveals new details in images, deepening our understanding of celestial objects. For more exploration of what we can learn from other wavelengths, visit NASA’s University of Learning ViewSpace Interactives. Read more...

The next generation in space-based telescope astronomy

The James Webb Space Telescope is the next chapter in space-based telescope astronomy. The Webb mission builds on the legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope’s powerful imaging capability and the Spitzer Space Telescope’s ability to detect light beyond the visible spectrum, into the mid-infrared range. Because infrared light travels through dense gas clouds that block visible light, Webb will reveal previously hidden regions of the universe: early galaxies, forming planets, brown dwarfs, and much more.

The largest telescope ever sent into space

Webb’s innovative design tackles the two main challenges for an infrared telescope: it has to have a large mirror to best capture enough light, and it has to be kept cold to keep unwanted sources of infrared from interfering with the light being observed. Webb’s tennis court-sized sunshields protect it from stray heat and light from the Sun, while its large segmented mirror—18 segments covering 6.5 meters (21.3 feet) at its widest point—enables it to effectively capture infrared light. Read more...